Texting and driving is being put to a complete stop in Australia. Since the beginning of December, these cameras have been placed strategically throughout the streets, catching those who choose to risk it all and use their mobile phones while operating their vehicles.

These cameras use artificial intelligence that has been designed to detect an individual using a cell phone. This may seem like a stretch, but this technology has been perfected to function any time of the day, at any speed, rain or shine.

Photo Credit: Daily Mail

Some cameras will remain in fixed locations, however, avoiding them will not be that simple. Many others will be fixed on the back of various trailers, making these devices moving hunters for their moving targets.

Photo Credit: 7 News

Drivers now have room for one mistake, as they will be issued a warning during the first three months following the installation of these cameras. After, its up to the drivers to either learn from their wrongdoings or to pay the price– literally. Once the three month introductory period comes to an end, text-and-drivers will face hefty fines ranging from $344 to $457 in school zones.

This change didn’t come from nothing, however. Prior to installing these cameras, a six-month test was conducted, detecting over 100,000 drivers using their mobile devices behind the wheel.

According to businessinsider.com, talking on the phone while driving, even when using a “hands-free” system, is equally as dangerous as driving while intoxicated, if not worse. Businessinsider.com references a study from the National Safety Council stating that 24% of car crashes occur due to cellphone usage.

As a result, a change in behavior is necessary. The individuals who have gone unscathed after years of texting and driving need to face consequences for their actions. These consequences may not be harmful to their vehicles, but they sure will be harmful to their bank accounts.

Overall, predictions state that these AI cameras have the potential to lessen fatal crashes by one hundred over the next five years. In that case, I think it’s time to flash the red light to texting and driving. Would you like to see technology like this here in the US? Leave a reply below or share this post to your Facebook or Twitter!